THE Rise developer Godfrey Mantle and Terranora Management Group development director Steve Macrae, with artist's impressions earlier this year.
THE Rise developer Godfrey Mantle and Terranora Management Group development director Steve Macrae, with artist's impressions earlier this year.

Council okays eight-storey blocks

A DEVELOPMENT which includes a new township with eight-storey apartments blocks on the “roof of the Tweed” - Terranora - has been given the thumbs up by council planners.

Tweed Shire planning officers have recommended councillors endorse a submission to the NSW Planning Department which says the $1.3 billion township, dubbed The Rise, for 4500 people “achieves many of the broader settlement imperatives” of council and government planning policies.

However they have warned the highly-visible eight-storey buildings would “lead to a visual character and dominance of the development that is unprecedented in the Tweed” and such a change in rules on building heights would normally require extensive community consultation.

Greens Party councillor Katie Milne has warned eight-storey buildings on the Terranora hilltop would be as high as the Q1 tower on the Gold Coast - Australia's tallest residential building.

A “concept plan” put to the Department of Planning by millionaire Brisbane developer Godfrey Mantle's company Terranora Group Management proposes 1804 residential dwellings, including 70 hillside houses, 160 resort apartments, 36 penthouses, 367 apartments, 176 villas and townhouses, 100 retirement cottages, 486 retirement apartments, plus a nursing home with 200 beds, a supermarket and restaurants.

The company has sought changes to the existing three-storey height limit for buildings between four and eight storeys high.

In their report council planning officers say: “The urban design philosophy of the proposal marks a significant departure from that pursued in the Tweed to date and is more characteristic of the hilltop-style developments emerging in neighbouring Queensland.

“The development, if approved, would mark a significant turning point in the management of the Tweed's natural environment.

“The proposed increase in heights on a prominent ridgeline is contrary to all strategic direction that Tweed Shire Council has previously undertaken.

“The applicant's urban design principals for increased height have some merit, however the real question is whether these principles fit within the context of this site.

“The normal process for council to consider a variation such as this is extensive public consultation.”



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