READY TO ROCK: One of the 14 baby blue tongues delivered by caesarean section.
READY TO ROCK: One of the 14 baby blue tongues delivered by caesarean section.

Emergency caesar for baby blue tongues

THE Christmas spirit of local wildlife carers and a Grafton veterinary clinic has enabled 14 baby blue tongue lizards to have a chance at life that could easily have eluded them.

About two weeks ago WIRES carer Therese Woodley brought a badly injured blue tongue lizard in to the vet to be euthanised.

Just before the needle went in, the lizard began to writhe about and a baby emerged.

"We did an x-ray of the lizard and saw a few more skeletons in there, so we decided to go in and get them out," a spokeswoman for the clinic said.

"We got 15 out, but one didn't make it," she said.

"It was amazing. On a busy day we had six people in the room helping out on a caesarean on a lizard."

WIRES carer Paul Jones and Therese decided to take the lizards into care, even though they can look after themselves at birth.

"Because of the special circumstances we decided to look after them for a little while," he said.

"Baby lizards are pretty easily picked up by magpies and kookaburras, so we gave these ones a little head start."

The pair split the care of the 14 little blue tongues evenly and reported all of them are back in the wild already.



Playing tricks on yourself to get healthy

Playing tricks on yourself to get healthy

Living Naturally with Olwen Anderson

Behind enemy lines: digger looks back on secret unit

Behind enemy lines: digger looks back on secret unit

Pottsville's Jim Banks will be the guest of honour at Anzac service

Holidaying at Fingal in 1913

Holidaying at Fingal in 1913

Talking History: Early photographers who capture spirit of the Tweed

Local Partners