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Euthanasia can be a touch of kindness, not akin to murder

Keeping people alive costs a lot of money, which the Queensland health system can’t afford.
Keeping people alive costs a lot of money, which the Queensland health system can’t afford. Kari Bourne

DEATH is always tragic.

But what is even more tragic is those who end up living in a vegetative state for years on end after a stroke or head trauma.

It is just cruel for someone to live like that. Even if you argue "but they can still hear you", you have to remember they hear machines and murmured voices of people in a hospital 24 hours a day, not Beethoven or the sounds of a rainforest.

If they can hear, they can feel pain.

The death of my step-grandmother on Sunday, whom I hold very dear to my heart, has sparked me to write today's column.

She lived in a virtual coma for three years, hooked up to machines. Prior to that she had suffered for years from dementia.

She had feared living in a coma after her own mother lived that way for five years before dying.

So why did my step-grandmother have to live her last few years this way?

Some people see euthanasia of people as being akin to murder.

Some people see euthanasia as a form of suicide, which some religions say is a one-way ticket to hell.

Animals are put down if they are suffering - this would be regarded as kindness.

Keeping people alive costs a lot of money, which the Queensland health system can't afford.

So why can't we have euthanasia rights for those who want it?

Do you think it is time for euthanasia laws in Queensland?

This poll ended on 28 June 2013.

Current Results

Yes

25%

No

73%

Undecided

0%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Topics:  dementia elderly people euthanasia hospital queensland stroke



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