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Eve, the cloned calf, shows future for beef industry

Cloned cow 'Eve' at Oaklands Brangus stud, Kalapa. Photo Sharyn O'Neill / The Morning Bulletin
Cloned cow 'Eve' at Oaklands Brangus stud, Kalapa. Photo Sharyn O'Neill / The Morning Bulletin Sharyn O'Neill ROK150213seve7

THE first calf has been born from a 'handmade cloning' process.

It  is potentially the first viable cloning method for large-scale improvement of the beef industry.

A simple dissecting microscope and micro blade were used to dissect and reconstruct the embryo to effect 'somatic cell nuclear transfer'.

The resultant calf, Eve, was born during the massive floods at the end of January but is now coping well.

 

CQUniversity researcher Professor Gábor Vajta has been working on the more viable handmade cloning technique in collaboration with local firm Australian Reproductive Technologies (based at Mt Chalmers near Rockhampton). Positive results were instant and a pregnancy was achieved on only the second attempt.

 

ART Managing Director Simon Walton says the overall goal is to find the best way to commercialise cloning for the benefit of the cattle industry.

"The new technique will continue at an experimental level for a while but longer-term the goal is a viable commercial, industrial application."

Topics:  beef cquniversity editors picks science



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