Andre Clayden at the Springbrook observatory.
Andre Clayden at the Springbrook observatory. John Gass

Full lunar eclipse over Tweed

THE full lunar eclipse tomorrow night will put on a show that everyone can enjoy - weather permitting.

Springbrook Observatory director of observation Andre Clayden said the full eclipse was a reliable astronomical event but weather always played its part.

"You don't need a telescope to have a look at it," Mr Clayden said.

"This is one of the few astronomical events you can see even if you've only got one good eye."

The earth's shadow will start moving over the moon at 11.45pm (NSW) tomorrow, with the full eclipse at 1.12am Sunday morning.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology predicts cloudy conditions and one or two showers across the Tweed during the eclipse.

"The moon will look red at the time of the full eclipse. How red it looks depends on the atmospheric conditions at the time," Mr Clayden said.

He said these events always sparked people's interest in astronomy.

"This is one show that's out of our control," Mr Clayden said.

"People will see the stars appear during the eclipse of the full moon and then disappear once the shadow passes."

The last total lunar eclipse over Australia occurred about five years ago.



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