Kian Watson, Nic Compton and Samara Hayes at the St Josephs College careers day yesterday.
Kian Watson, Nic Compton and Samara Hayes at the St Josephs College careers day yesterday. Blainey Woodham/ Tweed Daily News

Generation Y asks: why not?

SAINT Josephs College students yesterday denied they were “picky” about jobs, saying they were willing to work menial jobs while they strived to achieve their goals.

Two days after senior government politicians, including Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, told Generation Y to lower their job expectations, year 10 St Josephs students at a careers day yesterday refused to let the economic downturn get in the way of their ambitions.

Kian Watson has a goal to become a doctor, Samara Hayes an art teacher, Nic Compton wants to start his own physiotherapy business and Mark Kenney aims to become a pharmacist.

Nic denied he was picky about jobs.

“We do pretty much take what we can get, we all work crappy jobs,” he said.

“But we don't just want to struggle though,” he added.

Mark agreed.

“We have ambitions to have a car and a house, and achieve something in our lives,” he said.

The annual careers day welcomes universities, TAFE, group training organisations and employers to St Josephs as part of a program to help year 10 students make important choices about their subjects for year 11 and 12.

Careers advisor Matthew Hall said St Josephs gave students a variety of skills that would allow them to make choices about their employment.

“From the college's perspective, we are giving kids choices and encouraging them to explore a variety of options, rather than have them walk in to the first job they come across,” Mr Hall said.

“The school leaving age has changed to 17, which is really forcing kids to seriously think about getting skills that will get them employment at 17.”

Curriculum co-ordinator Natalie Bryett said the school gave students career options, but let them know there was hard work in store.

“We very much have a focus on options and life choices for our students, so we offer many pathways to go down,” she said.

“The notion of hard work beginning the journey is very much a part of the process for the students.

“You don't get anything without putting something of yourself into it in the first place.”



Greens slam compulsory acqusition of hospital site

Greens slam compulsory acqusition of hospital site

MP says government is "wasting millions of taxpayers money”.

Council in hot water after secret decision to halt business

Council in hot water after secret decision to halt business

Tweed's water extraction debate is heating up, again

Work begins on the last of the major flood repairs

Work begins on the last of the major flood repairs

Tweed flood repairs get big funding boost

Local Partners