Brielle Hallett, from Tweed Library, says well-written books will always be in demand.
Brielle Hallett, from Tweed Library, says well-written books will always be in demand.

Getting a read on the classics

THERE is nothing more enjoyable or fulfilling than a good book.

Classic tales stand the test of time, and each year avid readers are introduced to new worlds and characters through a new batch of bestsellers.

The BBC has, with the help of fans, come up with a list of the 100 best books of all time.

These were the books people believed had earned the title of classic and should be at the top of every bucket list.

However after conducting studies and surveys, the BBC discovered that the average person had only read six of the 100 books listed.

This statistic has driven people to seek out the list, hoping to calculate how many of the classics they have read and hopefully beat the average.

The list has even made it to social networking giant Facebook, with hundreds of users using an application to calculate their book score and show it off to their friends.

Richmond Tweed Regional Library acting manager Jo Carmody said reading the list was like taking a walk down mem- ory lane.

“Looking at this list from a personal point of view I found some of my all-time favourites as a child reader, those being Charlotte's Web, Winnie the Pooh, The Faraway Tree Collection and when I was a bit older The Three Musketeers,” Ms Carmody said.

“I counted about 58 from the list I had read, but some of them are thanks to my studies in English literature when I was doing my library and information degree. Some of these titles I have enjoyed immensely, such as Great Gatsby, Life of Pi, Shadow of the Wind, The Colour Purple and A Town Like Alice. Others I have struggled through such as Middlemarch and Persuasion.

“But reading is such a personal thing. Others will look at my favourites and come up with an entirely different list and question my taste in reading.”

Ms Carmody said book lists fluctuated with the latest trends and interests and it would be interesting to see which books were on the list in 10 years time.

Asked what made a book special, Tweed Heads Library assistant Brielle Hallett did not hesitate in her reply.

“What makes these books classics is that they are all very well written,” Ms Hallett said.

“There is still a huge demand for books and we still have so many people coming in to borrow them.

“Even with e-books, people still like to hold a book in their hands; they like to flip the pages. It's all about the experience.”

The BBC book list features critically acclaimed works such as The Lord of the Rings and Pride and Prejudice, along with children's classics Winnie the Pooh and The Wind In the Willows, reminding us that we are never too young or old to enjoy a great book.



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