Motorists need to be more aware of the impacts their decisions behind the wheel have on those around them.
Motorists need to be more aware of the impacts their decisions behind the wheel have on those around them. Tom Huntley

Greater road awareness needed

CARS are hard, but people are soft. This was the chilling take-home message of the first instalment of the Tweed Heads PCYC Traffic Offenders Intervention Program on Wednesday night.

This week’s session was fronted by former Tweed/Byron Local Area Command Superintendent Michael Kenny.

Having worked on the frontline of policing for many years, Supt Kenny said he had been forced to inform too many people their loved ones had been injured, or worse.

Michael Kenny when he was Tweed/Byron LAC Superintendent in 2010. Mr Kenny presented the first session of the Tweed Heads PCYC Traffic Offenders Intervention Program on Wednesday night.
Michael Kenny when he was Tweed/Byron LAC Superintendent in 2010. Mr Kenny presented the first session of the Tweed Heads PCYC Traffic Offenders Intervention Program on Wednesday night. Crystal Spencer

About 20 attendees filed into the PCYC, marching the walk of shame past basketball players.

I’d prepared myself for two hours of boredom, to avoid disappointment.

But among a brush-up on the recovery position and an update on the latest to-dos of CPR (note: you’re no longer expected to give mouth-to-mouth unless it’s someone close to you), I realised something about the way we use the roads.

Like almost every part of our modern, digitised lives, some seem to drive in a bubble. You can control just about every aspect of your environment, to the point it can be easy to forget there’s a world outside.

I was travelling back to the office the morning after attending this TOIP introduction, when a police car and motorbike lit up and, sirens blaring, appeared in front of me on Tweed Valley Way. Motorists in front of them were oblivious.

Little did any of us know they were on their way to a fatal motorbike accident at Stokers Siding.

Authorities can try to force statistics into our brains, but they don’t always stick. We need a shift from the notion we’re entitled to use and abuse the roads.

Before you next get behind the wheel, ask yourself this question: would you be okay with losing a loved one, or your own life?



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