Cudgen capsicum, eggplant and sweet potato grower Matthew Prichard is glad to see some sun.
Cudgen capsicum, eggplant and sweet potato grower Matthew Prichard is glad to see some sun. John Gass

Growers see sunny side

GROWERS throughout the Tweed have praised the sun as it made a long-awaited return yesterday, bringing with it blue skies.

Cudgen capsicum, eggplant and sweet potato grower Matthew Prichard, who runs the farm along with his brother Henry, said he had never been so happy to see the sun.

“I don’t think many people would be looking forward to any more rain,” Mr Prichard said.

“It’s been too wet to even get out on the ground, and it takes a few days to dry.”

Although the rain has subsided for now, Mr Prichard said there were still other dangers to the crops.

“We had a couple of wallabies come and eat the first few plants,” he said.

“Good luck to them to try and eat the whole paddock though.”

Cudgen sweet corn and sweet potato grower Doug Paddon said although it’s good to see the sun, sweet corn crops still needed a bit of water.

“During the last week we’ve had three hot days and the sweet corn started to wilt a little,” Mr Paddon said.

“They like a bit of moisture.”

Combined Tweed Rural Industries Association president Col Brooks said although vegetable farmers may want the heat, it could cause problems for the cane farmers.

“The vegie growers will be pleased to see some fine weather,” he said.

“But young sugar cane can heat up, and it can kill the cane.”

Mr Brooks said cane has been the worst hit industry due to the wet.



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