Jury still quiet in shotgun attempted murder case

UPDATE: A JURY was deliberating late on Thursday, considering its verdict in the trial of a man accused of shooting his former girlfriend's new partner.

Robert Kingsley Corowa, 34, has been charged with attempted murder. He is accused of shooting Marko Marjanovic in the shoulder outside a Gold Coast home in November 2011.

It is also alleged Mr Corowa hired a private investigator and that together they followed the former girlfriend from the Gold Coast to Ipswich and Toowoomba earlier in the day before the shooting occurred.

Closing submissions finished on Thursday morning and the jury retired to consider its verdict. It returned later in the day to review evidence and retired again to continue deliberations. - ARM NEWSDESK  

 

EARLIER: A GUN expert has been quizzed in court about how close a gun has to be to someone to risk causing death.

Robert Kingsley Corowa, 34, is on trial at Brisbane Supreme Court for attempted murder.

He is accused of shooting his former girlfriend's new partner Marko Marjanovic in the shoulder outside a Gold Coast home on November 26, 2011.

It is alleged Mr Corowa used a shotgun and fired several shots in Mr Marjanovic's direction.

During the day leading up to the alleged shooting, police believe Mr Corowa and a private investigator followed the former girlfriend from the Gold Coast to Ipswich and Toowoomba, where it is believed she picked up Mr Marjanovic before returning to the Gold Coast.

On Monday, on the fourth day of Mr Corowa's trial, an expert who studied the pellets from the alleged shooting gave evidence in court.

Mr Corowa's defence barrister Winston Terracini QC asked the expert whether holding a gun barrel to someone's head and pulling the trigger had a high potential of seriously injuring or causing someone's death and the man agreed.

"But if you discharge a shotgun… from a distance of up to 25m and it's got birdshot and you hit somebody in the shoulder, the risk of death is virtually nil, isn't it?" the barrister asked.

"I couldn't put a figure on that," the expert responded. "As you said, where it hits is quite significant in the ultimate outcome but at those distances an individual pellet is still capable of injuring something that will be a threat to your life."

The man also said there was no way of knowing whether the alleged gunman moved between shots but evidence suggested that he did because there was about 3.5m between shot shells.

The expert also agreed with Mr Terracini that there was no way of being sure from the cartridges whether the gun used was an ordinary non pump-action shotgun or a shortened pump-action shotgun.

The trial continues. - ARM NEWSDESK



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