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Hear, hear, new aids alter lives

LIFETIME International Training College manager Amanda Care shows off her new hearing aid which allows her to hear colleagues such as Maxine Davidson (back) better.
LIFETIME International Training College manager Amanda Care shows off her new hearing aid which allows her to hear colleagues such as Maxine Davidson (back) better. Blainey Woodham/Tweed Daily News

AMANDA Care understands the restrictions a hearing loss can place on work productivity.

Thankfully, Ms Care is no longer one of the millions of Australians who struggle to follow basic conversations at work.

Ms Care is the training manager at Lifetime International Training College and has had a profound hearing loss since birth.

“I got my first hearing aid when I was two-and-a-half and I was fitted with a bra-like contraption that sat on the outside of my clothes,” she said.

“The ear piece was really hard and it would fall out every time you ran or skipped.”

But Ms Care's first hearing aid is a far cry from her latest high-tech device that allows her to Bluetooth her mobile and fixed phone directly to her aid.

“I can hear it ring loudly without disturbing other people in the office,” Ms Care said.

“I can also connect it to the TV and music through Bluetooth and it transmits the sound to me so I can sit back and relax.

“I'm not as tired from concentrating and lip-reading anymore.”

Ms Care was fitted with her new digital aid at Bay Audio in Tweed Heads.

“I went to them because they do free hearing tests,” she said.

“I'd advise anyone to just go get their hearing tested.

“I was missing out on a lot. It really does make a huge difference.”

Bay Audio general manager Andrew Campbell said on average people wait seven years after the onset of hearing loss before taking action.

Mr Campbell said this hesitation is due to a fear of 'losing face' among peers and a misconception about the size of hearing aids.

However, with hearing technology now available in micro sizes and with wireless capabilities, Mr Campbell said there is no reason for hearing loss to hamper business productivity.

“Hearing products today are extremely discreet and designed to enhance your life,” he said.



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