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Is too much fragrance making you feel sick?

Is too much fragrance bad for our health?
Is too much fragrance bad for our health? SIphotography

vanessa.horstman

LIVING NATURALLY with Olwen Anderson

EVER found yourself pausing at the supermarket cleaning products aisle, uncertain whether to push your trolley through the cloud of smells? Would you get one of those mysterious headaches? Sneeze? Have trouble breathing until you got back into the open air? For some people this supermarket aisle has become the one to avoid. If you've experienced this you're not alone; more and more people are finding our lives are over-fragranced.

There's a reason why you're not feeling overwhelmed by different smells already: soon after experiencing the new scent your nose stops registering it. For example, as you're putting on your t-shirt you'll briefly get a whiff of the laundry powder, but then it will go. So although it seems like the perfume you applied earlier has all gone, in fact other people can still smell it.

Think your life isn't over-perfumed?

Tally up the number of fragranced products you've encountered already today. You might have washed your hair with a nice-smelling shampoo, used a perfumed soap. An aerosol deodorant spray helped avert worries your perspiration would offend others, and you used after-shave too, the one your partner appreciates. The clothes you're wearing were washed in perfumed laundry powder. In the kitchen, your bin liner was fragranced, the dishwasher detergent had its own distinctive smell, and just in case your house didn't smell pristine, an automatic dispenser sprayed air 'freshener' regularly.

That's a lot of artificial chemicals your body has encountered even before breakfast.

Questions are being asked now about whether our exposure to fragrance is affecting our health. After all, we can absorb chemicals across our lungs, increasing the burden of toxins our livers and kidneys have to process.

Kate Grenville, author of 'The Case Against Fragrance' has asked some hard questions about perfume while reviewing research already done on the effect of synthetic fragrances. She didn't find many answers, but her research generates even more worrying questions about what we unconsciously splash around in our quest to smell good. It's a book worth reading if you suspect inhaling artificial fragrances could be affecting your breathing, generating mysterious headaches, creating nausea, even upsetting your hormones and nervous system.

There's lots you can do to help yourself, beyond opening windows. Select unfragranced products more often. And grow some greenery indoors.: house plants have been found to be particularly adept at absorbing the chemicals that make up artificial fragrances.

Olwen Anderson is a naturopath and counsellor. www.olwenanderson.com.au

Topics:  health advice living naturally with olwen anderson



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