It’s snake season

Tweed Valley Wildlife Carer Joe Cabale with an injured keelback snake
Tweed Valley Wildlife Carer Joe Cabale with an injured keelback snake

TWEED Valley Wildlife Carers are receiving an average of six to eight calls a day asking for snakes to be removed in and around homes across the region.

We are currently getting between 15-20 calls per day to the 24-hour hotline for advice and reports of injured wildlife.

Most of the calls have been concerning the harmless carpet python, but there have also been a few of the highly venomous eastern brown snakes found across the Tweed.

They're coming out of their minimal activity of the cooler months at the moment and are looking for food and a mate and people often come across them in yards and on verandas.

I recently had a man request that we remove a carpet python from his yard and relocate it. I had to explain that the yard is the snake's habitat.

We are able to assist with snake relocation, if it's in your house, regardless of whether it's harmless or not.

But if it's just in your yard, it's best to leave it alone and keep pets away.

A quick spray with the garden hose is a safe way to encourage a snake to move off if it is in an unsuitable area of the yard. We do not encourage any members of the public to attempt to handle any snake.

As all native animals, including snakes, have a limited area that they are familiar with, we are not permitted to relocate snakes too far away from where they are found.

Please take care with wildlife on the roads.

Recently we had to have four snakes euthanised in one day that had been hit by cars and badly injured.

There were two carpet pythons, an eastern brown snake and a red-bellied black snake.

On Monday I saw two adult goannas (lace monitors) that had been killed by cars - one at Crabbes Creek and another on Tweed Valley Way just before Burringbar.

I'm currently nursing back to health a keelback snake struck by a whipper snipper.

Not only are they non-venomous, but they are the only snakes in the Tweed that can eat cane toads without it being fatal.

Lots of baby birds have been found on the ground of late. They're at the stage of learning to fly and sometimes it takes a bit of practice before they soar.

If you find one, put it safely up high away from predators and call us.

For any advice or information about our local wildlife, and for orphaned or injured native animals, please call our 24-hour hotline.

Phone 02 6672 4789 or go to our website at tvwc.org .au.



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