JELLY STING: Surfers leave Cabarita Beach after a series of stinger attacks.
JELLY STING: Surfers leave Cabarita Beach after a series of stinger attacks. Conal Healy

Jellyfish attacks at Cabarita Beach

REPORTS of at least 20 people were attended to by lifesavers at Cabarita Beach on Sunday following a large number of bluebottle stings.

Surf Life Saving Far North Coast Branch director of lifesaving, Chris Samuels, confirmed there had been an increase in bluebottles on Tweed Coast beaches.

"You often get them when there's north north east winds, which we've had a lot of recently,” Mr Samuels said. "You get them more in the summer period because they're a bit more prominent.”

Mr Samuels said it wasn't a surprise that many surf-goers were reporting stings.

"When there's high beach volumes and the high number of blue bottles in the area it becomes more common,” he said.

But Mr Samuels said people should still stay vigilant of bluebottles when in the water.

"They have a similar sting to a bee so people who have allergies to bees and those toxins need to be cautious,” he said.

While eight people have been hospitalised in the past fortnight following irukandji stings at Fraser Island, Queensland, Mr Samuels said he wasn't concerned yet that there could be sightings of the jellyfish on the Tweed Coast.

"The waters are still cool down here,” he said.



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