News

Save bubs by keeping them cool as summer temps soar

Babies aren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and are more susceptible to heat-related illnesses.
Babies aren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and are more susceptible to heat-related illnesses. Tony Martin

WITH much of Queensland already experiencing high temperatures, parents and caregivers are being reminded to keep babies and young children cool to avoid heat-related illness.

Queensland chief health officer Jeannette Young said babies and children weren't able to easily adapt to changing temperatures and they were more susceptible to heat-related illnesses.

"Children have a lower capacity to sweat, which reduces their ability to lose body heat by evaporation," Dr Young said.

"Babies and young children are completely dependent on adults to supply their essential needs, so it's important for adults to monitor their child's condition during periods of hot weather and take precautionary measures."

Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS) acting commissioner David Eeles said there were a number of preventative measures parents and caregivers could take to ensure babies and young children were protected from heat-related illnesses.

"Give children plenty of water before they become thirsty, avoid the use of ice and drinks that cause dehydration," Mr Eeles said.

Topics:  babies children health heat lifestyle summer weather



Police confirm tragic death at Fingal Head

File photo.

Police and surf lifesavers have ended a desperate search.

Labour of love honoured in detailing coast beauty

ICING ON THE CAKE: Editor Michael DeGood at home with his book about the Tweed Coast just prior to it being published.

'If we had known the sacrifices we would have run'

'We didn't get much sleep on Thursday nights'

OPENING: Pat and Alby Benstead at the opening of the first temporary ambulance quarters in Kingscliff in 1963.

Yellow Lady of Kingscliff recalls life in first Ambo station

Local Partners