Greg Rudd - older brother of former prime minister, Kevin Rudd - is running as an independent for the Senate.
Greg Rudd - older brother of former prime minister, Kevin Rudd - is running as an independent for the Senate. Kristy Muir

Kevin Rudd's 'jobs for the boys' sparks ALP anguish

KEVIN Rudd has infuriated ALP figures by bringing both his sons into the campaign team, while his brother is only voting for him out of loyalty.

News Corp reports that Mr Rudd's youngest son Marcus, 20, has joined the ALP's digital campaign team - and has already caused a stir after suggesting the use of a video from the TV satire, The Hollowmen.

The satirical series was loosely based on his father's first stint in the job.

The Prime Minister's older son, Nicholas, 24, has been on the ALP payroll for several weeks as a key adviser to his father. "People are pretty p****d off that both Rudd's sons are going to be there," a senior government adviser reportedly said.

Marcus joined the ALP's digital campaign team as a volunteer.

It has already been bolstered by the import of several members of Barack Obama's campaign squad.

Tom McMahon, the former executive director of the Democratic National Committee, Joon Kim, of the consulting firm New Partners, and British social media expert Matthew McGregor - dubbed "Barack Obama's digital attack dog" - will be part of the Prime Minister's election campaign team.

 

Should Kevin Rudd's sons be involved in the campaign?

This poll ended on 10 August 2013.

Current Results

Yes. They know their dad and they can work well together

17%

Yes. Heaven knows no-one else can work with Rudd

16%

No. It's a bad look. Jobs for the boys

35%

No. Surely there are more qualified people

30%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

 

Greg Rudd says only voting for Kevin for family reasons

Meanwhile, Mr Rudd's brother Greg Rudd, who is standing an independent Senate candidate in Queensland, has told News Corp he is only voting for the PM out of family loyalty.

"My sister would never speak to me again and my mother would rise from her grave," he said.

"I've told him I don't care which side of politics wins or who's prime minister," he said.

Greg Rudd, a former ALP ministerial chief-of-staff and political lobbyist, has previously told the Sunshine Coast Daily he believes the structure of Parliament means politicians and political parties are so obsessed with one-upmanship and political survival that they struggle to introduce policies that genuinely improve Australia.

"What's happened is that 'putting country first' is no longer a first order priority - it's not even a second order priority - we're lucky if it comes third, fourth or fifth," Mr Rudd said.

"So how on Earth are we going to prosper in the world as a country if we cannot agree on sensible bedrock economic policy that is vital and important for this country?"

When Kevin became Prime Minister, however, Greg sought to avoid potential perceived conflicts and moved to China, where he continued in high-level consultations.

"I am convinced Australia is the lucky country, but Australia is not going to stay lucky unless we get our act together and think about how we fit into the global world, rather than having these silly political fights between major sides of politics in Australia, where the level of debate is so poor and repetitive that it's not dealing with the key issues," Greg Rudd said.

 

Is it time to end Australia's party political system?

This poll ended on 10 August 2013.

Current Results

Yes. It's time the country's interests were put ahead of party politics

37%

Yes. Too many backroom deals determining leaders and policies

26%

No. Parliament would not function with lots of independents

22%

No. There needs to be some unity and uniform policies

13%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.



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