PLANNING: Councillor Ron Cooper is looking forward to hearing from the community about the draft Kingscliff Locality Plan changes to height limits.
PLANNING: Councillor Ron Cooper is looking forward to hearing from the community about the draft Kingscliff Locality Plan changes to height limits. Scott Powick

Kingscliff's future is on the table

THE future of Kingscliff is front of mind ahead of a community meeting on the controversial draft Kingscliff Locality Plan.

Tweed Shire Council is hosting two community round table discussions on Tuesday at Kingscliff Beach Bowls Club, with each session expected to see 100 people share their thoughts on the draft plan.

Council is looking to hear first-hand the community's opinion about the the changes to height limits made in 2017, limiting medium-density residential zones to 12.2m and business zones to 13.6m.

"(The) biggest concern is that highrises will hit Kingscliff and ruin it forever,” Bronwyn Warden wrote on Facebook.

"Everyone wants to try to maintain a coastal village atmosphere. It's why most of us are here. Change that and we will move somewhere else.”

Another resident, Annie Maxwell, agreed that she didn't want Kingscliff to "turn it into another Surfers Paradise.”

But height limits aren't the only thing people have concerns about, with many residents taking to social media to state they'd also like to discuss the Tweed Valley Hospital location, off-leash dog areas and traffic.

Gary Matthews said he would like to see the extension of Turnock St to Tweed Coast Rd completed "as soon as possible”.

"We need to urgently funnel traffic in and out of Kingscliff,” Mr Matthews said.

Meanwhile, another resident, Lynley Casey, said she'll be raising the issues of youth facilities, building heights and quality of builds and open spaces for dogs at the meeting on Tuesday.

Earlier this week, the Tweed Daily News reported on a petition by Kingscliff residents calling for no new development on flood-prone land in the area.

Kingscliff residents, including Jerry Cornford, Neville Dunn and David Harries, have started a petition asking government to pressure Tweed Shire Council to remove the areas designated for future urban development on flood designated land in the Kingscliff Draft Locality Plan, on the grounds that expansion poses an unacceptable flood risk to current and future residences in West Kingscliff. This is a follow-on from the protest against the Gales DA for fill and drainage behind the Shopping Centre, which we covered last year.
Kingscliff residents, including Jerry Cornford, Neville Dunn and David Harries, have started a petition asking government to pressure Tweed Shire Council to remove the areas designated for future urban development on flood designated land in the Kingscliff Draft Locality Plan, on the grounds that expansion poses an unacceptable flood risk to current and future residences in West Kingscliff. This is a follow-on from the protest against the Gales DA for fill and drainage behind the Shopping Centre, which we covered last year. Scott Powick

Councillor Ron Cooper, who ran his election campaign on Kingscliff height limits and greater community consultation, said he believed this new form of round table discussion could be a healthy way for the council to reconnect with the community.

"This has always been the sort of consultation I thought we should have,” Cr Cooper said.

"It's widespread. (The Kingscliff Locality Plan) is three volumes of 350 pages each in a language that's not plain English. For council to put three documents out as one study is a cope out.

"At this particular occasion they will be able to simply share what people hope for Kingscliff and then be advised when they get some feedback that whether their aspirations are embedded in the document and that's the best we can do at this stage.”

While the draft plan will also include planning for the Gales Holdings site, the environmental protection areas over the site are subject to negotiation and will not be finalised before the public exhibition period.

Gales Holdings director Dr Stephen Segal speaks to concerned residents during the open day in Kingscliff.
Gales Holdings director Dr Stephen Segal speaks to concerned residents during the open day in Kingscliff. Aisling Brennan

But Tweed Heads resident and former council candidate Terry Sharples said it was important the community also considered the impact any future Gales development might have on the area.

"At the end of the day, they hold a lot of significant land and one way or another it'll be developed over time,” he said.

"The community should be given a choice in what they think should happen in terms of Gales plans.”

Each round table discussion is fully booked, however Cr Cooper said he believed council was planning to host more soon.

"My aim was to always get 10 per cent of a locality (at these meetings) and in a place like Kingscliff that's 600 but we might reach 400,” he said.

"It's already the biggest consultation council has ever done.”



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