Senior council staff Jon Lynch, Troy Green and Shane Davidson with a model set up to show what Kingscliff will look like under the new draft locality plan.
Senior council staff Jon Lynch, Troy Green and Shane Davidson with a model set up to show what Kingscliff will look like under the new draft locality plan. Sue Gardiner

Kingy plan gets green light, so far

THE new draft blueprint for Kingscliff's future development appears to be winning over residents and visitors alike.

A feedback board on Tweed Shire Council's Marine Pde shop front, where visitors are asked to register their views on the town's locality plan - placed on public exhibition this week - shows a vast majority of green dots, signifying approval of what is being planned.

It is proposed that Marine Pde remains at the current building height of 11m (or up to three storeys), or remain at  the existing allowed building height limit of 13.6m.

This, predictably, has received majority support.

However, more controversially, the height limit could be lifted to 16.6m on the Kingscliff shopping centre side of Pearl St and along the undeveloped land fronting Turnock St, from roundabout to roundabout.

 

Council's shop front at Kingscliff has been attracting about 80 people a day.
Council's shop front at Kingscliff has been attracting about 80 people a day. Sue Gardiner

This would see buildings of up to five storeys, permitting shop-top housing.

For some people, this has triggered concerns that the Tweed could become like the Gold Coast.

But according to council staff, once it's explained that the plan would enable the maximum maintenance of green space as well as strengthen existing businesses, many residents' concerns are allayed.

Of the 52 shop-front visitors who had voted by Friday afternoon, 36 approved of the height increase, with 16 against and two undecided.

The shop front, set up by council to talk through the new plan, is now attracting an average of up to 80 people a day, according to general manager Troy Green.

Kingscliff Ratepayers Association president Dot Holdom was one of 14 community members who helped shape the draft plan over 18 months, in what she said had been a "very open" process.

Ms Holdom said they had sought to strike a balance between keeping a low-key coastal feel in the main street and providing extra housing, which would allow residents to walk to services and maintain green areas.

 

The feedback board at council's Kingscliff shop front features lots of green dots signifying residents’ approval.
The feedback board at council's Kingscliff shop front features lots of green dots signifying residents’ approval. Sue Gardiner

"None of us were backward in coming forward, and if we had a concern we put it out there," she said.

"We were able to have a phenomenal amount of input and the mantra has always been … the greater the density the greater the green.

"We were looking at constantly being mindful that we're an ageing demographic, that young people will need a good solid planning document for the next 30 years.

"It's time for the residents to find out information and talk about aspects of the plan and then submit back to council with their feedback."

The council's shop front remains open at 2/98 Marine Pde from 8.30am to 4pm.



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