BIG BITE: Paul Sharp looks through a great white shark’s jaws from his mobile shark museum, currently located next to Chinderah Bay Antiques.
BIG BITE: Paul Sharp looks through a great white shark’s jaws from his mobile shark museum, currently located next to Chinderah Bay Antiques. Nolan Verheij-Full

Meet Frankie shark

"HAVE SHARK, will travel," boasts Paul Sharp's business card.

True to his claim, Mr Sharp's 1957 Leylan Regal bus, parked on the corner of Chinderah Bay Rd and Waugh St, does contain an actual great white shark - albeit a mummified one.

"Frankie is his name," Mr Sharp said proudly as the Tweed Daily News made its way through the Shark in a Bus museum.

"This great white shark was caught in 1978 in Western Australia as a response to the public hysteria surrounding Jaws," he said.

"My father wanted to teach people that sharks weren't so bad and he thought the best way to do it was to have an actual shark to show them."

The bus is in town until Wednesday, and in addition to the Frankie exhibit - which includes his eyeballs, heart and last lunch (a swordfish) - the bus also has shark jaws, a sei whale skull, a leafy sea dragon and stonefish specimens.

Entry costs $5 and for that you also get to experience what the guts of an ocean beast smells like - just by entering the bus.



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