Ali Eather, a corporate lawyer, loves the new-look Miss Supercars competition, which now has personal development and professional workshop elements embedded into the program.
Ali Eather, a corporate lawyer, loves the new-look Miss Supercars competition, which now has personal development and professional workshop elements embedded into the program.

Meet Tweed's 'empowered' Miss Supercars finalists

ALTHOUGH the winner of the iconic Miss Supercars contest is guaranteed a one-way ticket to stardom, glitz and celebrity are the last things on the minds of two competition finalists who hail from the Tweed.

It is, rather, the competition's recalibrated focus, geared towards "women's empowerment" and away from the grid-girl "stigma", that has Ali Eather and Gemma Buck thrilled to be a part of the famous pageant.

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With a more holistic competition format in 2018, the Miss Supercars program now includes personal development, professional workshops, publicity, social media, make-up, catwalk sessions and life coaching workshops.

 

Gemma Buck, a mother and office manager at a local radiology practice, hopes that through the Miss Supercars competition she can encourage other women to push out of their comfort zones.
Gemma Buck, a mother and office manager at a local radiology practice, hopes that through the Miss Supercars competition she can encourage other women to push out of their comfort zones.

Gone are the days of the grid-girl stereotype, according to Eather and Buck, who want to be part of a rethink about the place of women in motorsport.

"The reason I entered was I was really drawn to the personal development and empowerment component of the program," said Ali Eather, a 30-year-old corporate lawyer from Kingscliff.

"I feel like it really focuses on empowering, not just women in motorsport but women generally."

 

Ali Eather is an avid traveller and first-time Miss Supercars contestant.
Ali Eather is an avid traveller and first-time Miss Supercars contestant.

Gemma Buck, a 33-year-old office manager at South Coast Radiology at Tweed Heads, said she "loves the message" the revamped Miss Supercars contest was promoting.

"In the past that stigma has been around for grid girls and now it's a whole new image," Buck said.

"It's gone away from the skimpy outfits and things of that nature. Now it's about women's empowerment and supporting an iconic sport.

"We are also raising money for disadvantaged children through Variety Children's Charity."

With a non-stop schedule including personal development courses, photographic judging, evening and swimwear rounds and interviews on top of track-side duties and a spot in the beach volleyball event, both contestants are looking forward to having fun and meeting some new mates.

"It's just going to be so much fun with all the great events we are attending, and it will be great to make a bunch of new girlfriends and share the experience with them," Eather said.

Buck agreed: "The whole experience will be a thrill," she said.

"I'm not looking at winning - if I did it would be a bonus - it's just the experience of meeting new friends, making new memories and going on new adventures."

- The GC600 hits the Gold Coast from October 19-21.

 



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