SURVEILLANCE CREW: Kaeeann Phillips, Jarrod Mye, Chase Coghill and Dylan Finn are learning how to operate shark surveillance drone technology.
SURVEILLANCE CREW: Kaeeann Phillips, Jarrod Mye, Chase Coghill and Dylan Finn are learning how to operate shark surveillance drone technology. Scott Powick

More eyes in the skies as drone program launches

THERE'S going to be a few extra eyes keeping watch over our oceans for sharks this summer.

Four new recruits from the ETC job seekers program are in the final stages of training to use the Westpac Little Ripper Drone technology and provide extra shark surveillance across the region's beaches and waterways.

The Ripper Aviation Academy's general manager Rob Curtis said the four-week internship provided valuable aerial surveillance training and ensured the students would be capable of improving public safety.

"The benefit of working with Australia's most famous and successful search and rescue drones, the Westpac Little Ripper lifesavers, is that they provide a bird's eye view over our waterways,” he said.

"Over previous seasons, we've successfully employed the Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver drones for shark surveillance, spotting swimmers in distress, identifying dangerous conditions such as rips and conducting the world's first surf rescue by a drone.”

ETC CEO Jenny Barnett said she looked forward to getting more young job seekers involved with The Little Ripper Group.



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