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Mum who delivered her own baby via c-section sparks debate

Jane Prichard births baby Tex through a maternal assisted caesarean.
Jane Prichard births baby Tex through a maternal assisted caesarean. Breathe Birth Photography - Rana

A KINGSCLIFF mother's photos of delivering her own baby have gone viral and sparked social media debate about elective cesareans.

Pictures of Jane Prichard's cesarean at John Flynn Hospital, in which she pulled her son from her womb with her hands, went viral two days ago when Tex was born.

The 33-year-old said it was an emotional experience to conceive Tex naturally following four miscarriages, five failed IVF attempts, and losing 50kg to battle polycystic ovarian syndrome.

She sobbed as she was wheeled into the labour ward of the Gold Coast private hospital.

"I was crying before they even cut me open, I was so happy ... it's been so difficult," she said.

With her husband Matthew beside her and the curtain typically separating mother from baby during surgery removed, Dr Shiri Dutt made an incision in Mrs Prichard's belly.

"Once they start cutting to get the baby out, (Dr Dutt) said 'we're getting close'.

"It was like someone was doing the washing inside your tummy, pushing and pulling.

"They removed a set of gloves, because I was wearing two pairs to be hygienic, and (Dr Dutt) guided my hands because I couldn't see past my belly and then he said 'pull'.

 

"I went to do it hard, and he said just 'go slowly', but I had to use force, like - he's stuck in there a bit.

"And gradually he came out then I I lifted him up and a midwife pulled away my surgical gown so he could go straight on my chest."

Tex Thomas Prichard was born at 7.50am on Wednesday September, 23, weighing 3.6kg and measuring 52cm long.

"He cried straight away, and I was wheeled to recovery. He was on the boob for an hour and half, and he's continued that pattern now."

Mrs Prichard's story has been the subject of pro-natural birth social media comment, since it went viral this week.

Critics have urged mothers to consider that vaginal birth after cesarean (or VBAC, as its colloquially known) would have been 'perfectly safe' for the the mother-of-two.

"VBACs are safe, but there's no guarantees that I could actually have one," Mrs Prichard said.

Six years ago Mrs Prichard had an emergency cesarean with her first son Jett and so for this pregnancy she had a daily self-administered injection of blood thinners to prevent miscarriage.

"The chance of emergency was, again, high for me," she said.

"With an emergency cesarean you don't remember anything; you don't have your husband in the room and you just get your baby wrapped in a towel and try to bond."

She said it could lead to a multitude of problems that she wanted to avoid.

"He's perfect and I got the experience that I wanted."

Although it was the first Maternal Assisted Cesarean at John Flynn, the procedure has been offered at many Australian and Queensland hospitals since as early as 2007.

Topics:  birth caesarean editors picks parenting



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