THE New South Wales police union says Queensland's no-pursuit policy put the public in danger during Thursday's alleged carjacking chase.   

The chase began Thursday afternoon in Caboolture north of Brisbane and spanned between the Sunshine Coast and Tweed Heads in New South Wales.  

The men allegedly carjacked three cars and drove at speeds of up to 160 kilometres per hour before being apprehended by NSW police south of the border.   

NSW Police Assocation president Scott Weber told the ABC that Queensland's policy on car chases had put the public in danger during the incident.    

"We cannot believe that the [Police] Commissioner of Queensland Ian Stewart has a no-pursuit policy, you can't do that in regards to protecting the community, you have to be able to pursue criminals," Mr Weber said.   

Two men allegedly highjack a car, forcing the previous occupants to flee.
Two men allegedly highjack a car, forcing the previous occupants to flee. image contributed

Mr Weber also told the ABC the chase went for too long and it was fortunate others were not seriously injured or killed. 

"We saw yesterday a police officer taken to hospital but there could have been a lot of people injured," he said.

"The scary part of this scenario is the no-pursuit policy in Queensland and these offenders could have got away with armed firearms to live another day to commit another crime where someone could have been injured or killed."



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