Teams tag shark.
Teams tag shark. Carl Charter- carlcharter.com.au

NSW tags its 100th white shark off north coast

THE Kingscliff shark listening station has another great white to monitor with Department of Primary Industries (DPI) tagging its 100th white shark on the North Coast this week.

NSW Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair said the 2.5m female was tagged at Airforce Beach, Evans Head.

"Since August, 2015 we have been targeting White, Bull and Tiger sharks with a particular focus on the NSW North Coast,” Mr Blair said.

"The tagging program provides vital information about sharks and their movements along the NSW coastline and beyond - some sharks have been detected as far away as New Zealand.

"NSW is leading the world - we are the only government using SMART drumlines to catch and tag white sharks.”

SMART drumlines are used to intercept sharks beyond the surf breaks, before they are able to interact with surfers or swimmers.

When a shark is caught on a SMART drumline, researchers receive a phone, email and text alert and, if conditions permit, they tag, relocate and release the shark.

Mr Blair said the more information they had, the better equipped they were to reduce the risk of further attacks.

"In addition to the 100 white sharks, we are actively tracking 33 bull and two tiger sharks, as part of our $16 million Shark Management Strategy.”

The 20 satellite-linked listening stations are installed along the NSW coastline, including at Kingscliff and Byron Bay, to track tagged sharks.



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