Tweed nurses Robin Fox, Margaret Balli, Leone Hartley, Brian Everson and Denise Harris enjoy morning tea on International Nurses Day.
Tweed nurses Robin Fox, Margaret Balli, Leone Hartley, Brian Everson and Denise Harris enjoy morning tea on International Nurses Day.

Nurses celebrate "their day"

TODAY was a day to celebrate nurses the world over, for everything from the compassionate care they give to strangers every day, to their strange sense of humour.

Nursing staff at the Tweed Hospital celebrated International Nurses Day with a morning tea and a chat, which may have included a discussion about vomit had the media not been present.

Robin Fox, Margaret Balli, Leone Hartley, Brian Everson and Denise Harris have about 167 years of nursing experience between them and after cracking a few jokes, told the Tweed Daily News you have to expect a weird sense of humour when you meet nurses - it is their way of dealing the stress of their work, whether it be cleaning up vomit or treating wounds.

"Nurses have a wicked sense of humour, but that is for our survivial," Ms Balli said.

Mr Everson said it was good being acknowledged by the public and medical peers on International Nurses Day each year.

"It is the only day of the year we get recognised by the public and other staff," Mr Everson said.

Each one of them has at least 20 years experience in the profession and Mr Everson said the change in nursing in that time was profound.

The job had developed in to a multi disciplinary approach, with a number of different career pathways to go down.

"Someone who works in intensive care is not necessarily going to be good in the ward," he said.

"We have changed but people’s perceptions haven’t necessarily changed about what a nurse is."

NSW Nursing Association General Secretary, Brett Holmes, said International Nurses Day gives the general public and nurses a chance to celebrate the contribution hundreds of thousands of nurses had made to NSW over the years and the importance of nursing to the state’s personal and social well-being.

"In hospitals, health facilities, community health, disability and aged care settings throughout the State nurses are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year to provide care for the sick, injured and elderly. That is again something to celebrate."



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