Upgrading the Cudgen Creek boardwalk has proved to be a difficult job however Council is putting more workers on the project to reopen a section of the shared-user path before the October school holidays.
Upgrading the Cudgen Creek boardwalk has proved to be a difficult job however Council is putting more workers on the project to reopen a section of the shared-user path before the October school holidays. Contributed

Plans to reopen Cudgen Creek Boardwalk early become reality

HOLIDAYMAKERS can expect to enjoy a nice stroll along an upgraded Cudgen Creek Boardwalk at Kingscliff ahead of schedule, as Tweed Shire Council deploys extra resources to get the job done.

Council has put more workers on the job upgrading Cudgen Creek Boardwalk at Kingscliff so it can reopen Clough Way before the NSW school holidays start in October, allowing cyclists and walkers to enjoy the facilities.

Despite a slow start in upgrading sections of the boardwalk due to the inability to access the site with machinery and environmental requirements set out by Fisheries to protect sea grass beds in the area, the project is due to be completed in November

Council's Roads and Stormwater Manager Danny Rose Work said works to replace the old timber section of boardwalk from Clough Way to Sunrise Cove with elevated concrete slabs above the waterway is proving slower than expected due to the constraints of the site,.

"Building this section of boardwalk is time-consuming because the entire build has to be done using manual labour and hand tools as machinery, such as excavators, cranes and concrete trucks, cannot access this tricky site," Mr Rose said.

"Unlike the two previous sections of the boardwalk which have already been upgraded to concrete, this section is mostly elevated above the creek. Piers had to be hand-tooled into the hard rock and we had to work around the tides. Each slab has to be poured in-situ and then left to cure for 28 days. Even the use of a barge for heavy equipment was not possible as we had to protect sea grass beds.

"We have also had problems procuring the balustrades and handrails for the upgrade. This has proved to be a more difficult job than we expected."

To meet this revised timeframe, Council has deployed an extra crew to site and reduced the scope of the concrete path upgrade to the south, leading to Ed Parker Park.

Council also has decided to reduce the speed limit on Sutherland Street, from Moss Street to the Kingscliff Bridge, to 40kmh to improve the safety of pedestrians and cyclists choosing not to use the signed detour through Jack Julius Park and Vulcan Street to Moss Street.

Reopening the boardwalk by late November will coincide with the reopening of Lions Park, currently undergoing a makeover to generally dress up the park, provide better connecting pathways and improved recreation facilities for residents and visitors.

New park shelters and barbecues will be installed in more central locations in the park to open up more space and allow additional facilities to be installed at the southern end of the park.



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