Koala Beach residents at the estate's 25-year celebration event.
Koala Beach residents at the estate's 25-year celebration event.

Pottsville locals celebrate estate’s ecological success

POTTSVILLE residents have celebrated the success of Koala Estate which began 25 years ago.

The detailed development planning and koala monitoring started in 1994 and the estate is widely recognised as a great place to live and an ecological success.

Council staff discussed habitat restoration and monitoring projects, information on compliance of companion animals and control of pests, as well as income expenditure for the estate.

Council’s director sustainable communities and environment Tracey Stinson said it was great to see a gathering of neighbours come together for a common cause.

“The Koala Beach estate community are passionate about protecting threatened species in the estate and it was wonderful to see residents come out and show their interest in being involved in further protection of the estate,” Ms Stinson said.

“There were many questions, ideas and suggestions discussed about how to improve the program of environmental protection and it’ll be great to re-establish the residents’ committee to oversee this in 2020.

“We all want to ensure the estate remains a sanctuary for wildlife, and managing the prohibition of dogs and cats is one way we are doing this, along with monitoring programs, and pest and habitat management.”

The development includes over 270 hectares of bushland reserved for nature conservation and is home to at least 24 threatened species and ecological communities.

Kooee Koala greeting some of the kids at the Koala Beach estate 25 year celebration event.
Kooee Koala greeting some of the kids at the Koala Beach estate 25 year celebration event.

Council’s senior program leader – biodiversity Scott Hetherington said Koala Beach was designed to ensure wildlife and habitats within and around the estate continued to thrive into the future, alongside the residential development.

He said Koala Beach was a highly significant area for the protection of wildlife, both common and threatened species alike.

“With more than 130 bird species recorded, it’s one of the top five hot spots in the Tweed,” Mr Hetherington said.

“The bushland reserves are a unique and valuable asset, providing habitat for many threatened plants, animals and communities.

“They are also a critical link between the reserves to the south and to the north,” he said.

A report will be provided to Council in February to recommend that expressions of interest for representatives on the Koala Beach Wildlife and Habitat Management Committee are called for.

If you are a resident of Koala Beach estate and want to join the e-newsletter mailing list and find out about opportunities to join the committee please email TSC@tweed.nsw.gov.au and use ‘Koala Beach Committee’ in the subject line or for more information about Koala Beach estate visit tweed.nsw.gov.au/koalabeach.



New Parkinson’s specialist nurse joins Tweed-Byron network

Premium Content New Parkinson’s specialist nurse joins Tweed-Byron network

People living with Parkinson’s disease now have added support

Hospitality businesses urged to sign up to COVID program

Premium Content Hospitality businesses urged to sign up to COVID program

The free meal voucher program is expected to be rolled out soon

NRL game brings Titanic amount of cash flow to Lismore

Premium Content NRL game brings Titanic amount of cash flow to Lismore

NRL game between brings huge economic benefit to the town