Brandon Thomas Abbott leaves Tweed Heads Local Court on Monday.
Brandon Thomas Abbott leaves Tweed Heads Local Court on Monday. Alina Rylko

Pottsville man flicks blood at police woman and threatens to bite dog

A POTTSVILLE father has been convicted of affray and assault after flicking blood at a police officer and threatening to bite a police dog after they were called to a knife fight at his home.

At Tweed Heads Local Court on Monday, Brandon Thomas Abbott was sentenced to 18 months service for affray and 14 months for assault against a senior female constable.

Both offences stemmed from a domestic argument between Abbott and his brother sometime between late Friday, April 15 this year and early the next morning.

The court heard at about 7.30pm on the Friday, the 40-year-old retail worker was visited by his brother after years of no contact and the pair began to drink Bourbon and Coke and beer.

Abbott's wife and children retired to bed at about 10pm before being woken at about midnight by the two brothers who were brawling in the family kitchen, which involved a small knife.

Evidence stated the witness saw "blood all over the kitchen and both accused and co-accused were covered in blood and suffering lacerations” before the fight moved to the front yard.

Police were called and arrived at about 12.28am.

The court heard Abbott was in an agitated state and "bleeding profusely from his right hand” before he flicked blood on the female senior constable and threatened to bite the police dog.

He was tasered and arrested but pleaded not guilty in court later, with his brother refusing to consent to a police investigation after being taken to Gold Coast University Hospital with stab wounds to his thighs, neck, ear and chest.

Dressed neatly in a suit, with slicked-back hair, Abbott sat in court yesterday as his Aboriginal Legal Service defence lawyer Jane Waddell pleaded for a lenient sentence.

The lawyer said Abbott was contributing to society by being employed full-time and showing insight into his offences by addressing an alcohol addiction, taking part in an On Track community program and by apologising to police.

"He's made a massive effort and sometimes it takes people that light-bulb moment to say enough's enough, but he has made the effort,” she said.

Ms Waddell asked for a good behaviour bond so Abbott could continue to work and so "the moment he puts his foot out of line, he's in jail”.

But Magistrate Michael Dakin said objective evidence showed Abbott was a "man with a tremendous propensity for violence” and using a knife and the assault of a police officer were both considered very serious offences.

"How many chances does someone need? .... There's got to be some punitive impact in the court,” he said, before delivering his conviction with a good behaviour bond for Abbott to serve out his sentence in the community with strict conditions.



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