Lifestyle

Psychic tickles her clients with feather readings

Psychic Jannine Umana says feather spirit readings have won over the wary.
Psychic Jannine Umana says feather spirit readings have won over the wary. Warren Lynam

FEATHERS meant much more to native American Indians than simply a headdress adornment.

They held a deeper, more spiritual significance, and the Indian culture was just one of several to express that.

Birds were considered divine creatures in ancient cultures because they lived in the sky and so were closer to heaven.

Their feathers, therefore, held strong spiritual worth.

Centuries later, Tewantin psychic Jannine Umana has begun delving into that spirituality, introducing feather readings to her long list of services.

"Because birds hold a high spiritual energy, it helps me tune into the higher realms and connect with the person's spirit," Jannine said.

"The feather that each person picks will be dependent on what is going for that person at the time.

"It is the external reflection of what is happening in the person's life at the time of picking the feather."

Jannine does feather readings for groups of about 10 at one of the participants' homes.

She asks that each person finds a feather from somewhere, and places it in a paper bag.

Jannine said the readings were much more light-hearted and less detailed than one-on-one appointments, but were a fun way for people to get together with friends and their spirits.

"What the readings find is what the person needs to change within themselves to have the future they want," she said.

"They (the feathers) take on the persona of the person who found them, so then I can read the feather."

Working under the title of Heart Unity, Jannine recently returned to the Coast after 15 months on the Gold Coast.

After introducing the feather readings, Jannine received eight bookings in the first week - an immediate success.

"Lots of people want to get a reading done but they're too scared to do it," she said.

"I thought, 'I need something that'll bring people to me who wouldn't usually come'."

Jannine said she had already converted some sceptics with this fun, fresh take on spirit readings.

"I'd really like to help people realise that this is a normal thing to do," she said.

"It's not scary or abnormal."

For more information see the Heart Unity website at heartunity.com.au.

 

FEATHER FACTS

  • Native American Indians believed feathers represented the power of the thunder gods, and the power of air and wind.
  • The Feathered Sun, honoured by the Native American Pueblo Indians, symbolises the cosmos and the centre of existence.
  • In Celtic culture, Druids would wear feathered robes in ceremonies to connect with the celestial realm.
  • Ancient Egyptians believed feathers represented sky gods. The Egyptian goddess of justice, Ma'at, would compare the hearts of the newly dead with a feather to determine the worthiness of one's soul.
  • In Christianity, feathers were symbols of virtue. An image of three feathers was made into signet rings - each feather symbolising charity, hope, and faith.

 

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Topics:  lifestyle psychic spirituality



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