Carly and Benjamin Hislop.
Carly and Benjamin Hislop.

Red noses keep public aware of infant deaths

DON'T worry, any bright red noses you see around Tweed Heads tomorrow are not a new mutation of swine flu, it is people showing their support for Red Nose Day.

Since 1989 red noses have brought awareness to the community about the risks of sudden infant death syndrome, and mums like Carly Hislop appreciate the effort.

She is well aware of the dangers of SIDS after having three children, Jake, Ella and 18-month-old Benjamin, who happily put a red nose on yesterday.

“He is my third child, and every time I go through the new-born baby stage I always get anxious and worried about one million times a night, as you do when you are a mum,” Mrs Hislop said.

She said there was no doubt the Red Nose Day campaign had made her more aware about the risks of sudden infant death syndrome with her children.



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