Tweed District Rescue Squad volunteer Mal Pearse and PCYC Traffic Offenders Intervention Program co-ordinator Rachel Way after the fifth session of the six-week program on March 23.
Tweed District Rescue Squad volunteer Mal Pearse and PCYC Traffic Offenders Intervention Program co-ordinator Rachel Way after the fifth session of the six-week program on March 23. Liana Turner

Rescuers have seen it all

IF YOU’RE in a serious road crash, chances are the volunteer rescue squad will be there.

Tweed District Rescue Squad volunteer Mal Pearse has been presenting at the Traffic Offenders Intervention program for more than a decade and was the facilitator of this week’s session at Tweed PCYC.

Over his quarter century in the emergency services, he has seen every crash scenario imaginable.

Mr Pearse was concerned the Tweed had already had three fatal car crashes this year and hoped presenting the program would help to meld young drivers’ minds into kicking unsafe habits.

One person died on NSW roads over the Easter long weekend.

“It’s not shaping up good,” Mr Pearse said.

“We need to get the message through... but as a community we’ve just become so de-sensitised to the blood and gore out there.”

TDRS attended 79 motor vehicle crashes last year.

Good to know

  • Those with a hearing or speech impairment can call for emergency help through the Text Emergency Relay Service, by dialling 106.
  • Loose items can become deadly in a crash, so secure whatever you can while on the road.
  • 24% of crash costs go to caring for the injured.


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