RATE RISE: Tweed residents will be paying more, and some of the blame lies with Queensland.
RATE RISE: Tweed residents will be paying more, and some of the blame lies with Queensland. ThinkStock

REVEALED: How much Tweed rates will rise

TWEED ratepayers are going to pay at least an extra $116.55 next financial year, and it's Queensland and China's fault.

Tweed Mayor Katie Milne will hand the details down next week, with the news that rates going up and there will be a massive increase in waste fees.

Rates will rise across the Tweed for residential, business and farmland owners by 2.7 per cent, while the total increase for all charges has increased by 4.7 per cent from the last 12 months.

The 2.7 per cent rate rise was the maximum increase allowed by the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal, announced in September last year.

Based on the minimum rates for next financial year, residential ratepayers will be slugged an extra $116.55.

The largest increases in this year's financial plan are in waste, with domestic services rising by almost 18 per cent and recycling service up by 50.46 per cent, and outsiders are the cause of it.

Council's Executive Manager for finance, revenue and information technology, Michael Chorlton, said legislation changes in Queensland and China had forced council to raise its domestic waste and recycling fees.

"What has happened in the recycling industry is that China would handle the world's recycling, but last year they said they would not accept it in the condition it is currently in," Mr Chorlton said.

"We now need to process our recycled goods to a much cleaner state than before so we can send them to other markets."

In Queensland, a new waste levy of $75 per tonne will come into affect from July 1.

This has a large financial ramification for the Tweed, which sends a lot of its waste to Queensland landfills.

Mr Chorlton said the council was expecting this levy to hit ratepayers pockets to the tune of approximately $1.3 million.

This big ticket item in this year's budget it a $5 million commitment from council towards the Stage Two upgrade of Arkinstall Park.

The joint initiative with the council and the department of education plans to build a new sporting facility on the neighbouring land at Tweed River High School, which would be available to the community after school hours and on weekends.

The environment is another winner in this year's budget, with Mayor Katie Milne advocating for more to be spent on protecting the region's nature and biodiversity.

An extra $450,000 will be invested into natural resources management, including $95,000 to employ a coastal ranger.

The budget will go before the councillors at next Thursday's meeting.



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