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Rituals can play a bonding role

WHETHER it is State of Origin, Australia Day, your birthday, or the anniversary of the passing of someone close to you, it is wonderful to believe in something because to believe is to give that event meaning.

It can be a time to reflect on the feelings we have around this event, what that means to us and what we believe about that.

Too often, events become a given for some - such as Christmas and Easter - where it is accepted and celebrated with little thought to the real meaning of the day.

Rituals and celebrations are important in family life because they allow us an opportunity to stop, think, feel and relax.

In a busy world, we rarely indulge in such luxuries, the norm being to work, work and continue to work.

One might ask how we can relax around the anniversary of the death of a loved one.

The notion here is to stop, think and feel in order to give ourselves permission to remember that individual, what they contributed to our life and what they truly meant to us.

If we pause long enough to do this, over time we can find a place of peace in our heart where the memory of that individual can rest with less apparent pain.

Even if we pause to watch a grand final match, we are doing so with intention, the event being a yearly ritual.

When the intention is there to watch, we relax and focus on the event rather than on the general difficulties of our life.

The belief and meaning might not stop at the desire to watch the performances of the athletes or to prove one team might be stronger than the other.

For many viewers, the belief and meaning of this match might be about feelings of patriotism and sharing the night with friends and family or to lose oneself in the celebration of the event.

 

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Topics:  celebration family lifestyle



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