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Great, zany ideas: Aussie youth share 5000 of them

Fancy a tissue box that never runs out - using recycled shredded paper?
Fancy a tissue box that never runs out - using recycled shredded paper?

GREAT ideas. Young people  are full of them.

But how often do we encourage them to dream big, think outside the square, innovate, and just create.

Fostering that passion - and those inventive processes - could, in the future, mean whether they have a job or have theirs replaced by a machine.

It's the sort of concern that has big companies like Apple and Samsung urging our kids to get into science, technology, engineering and maths.

Samsung recently launched Make My Idea - a program which saw more than 5000 ideas submitted from young people aged 12 to 25 in Australia.

Some of them were super practical - a clear toaster so you see whether or not your bread was becoming charcoal.

One clever suggestion was a safety hot pot range which changed in colour to red as it warmed up.

Others were a little more zany - the bacon scented bubble bath, the cordial tap, the scent fan or the every lasting tissue box recycling shredded paper.

There was also the cordial drip, the bike powered charger, and the brrrottle - a USB charged super cool water container for life in the great outdoors.

The groombot promised to use nano technology to clean your teeth and brush your hair.

How would you develop a smart helmet using memory foam?
How would you develop a smart helmet using memory foam?


A smart helmet using memory foam to allow your 'perfect fit' and a pet cleaning pet door, described as a carwash for your dog or cat, were among others.

What about an app that could read the mood of a room and play the best music for the crowd, or a thief proof handbag?

How about an edible burrito wrap or a bin that could move towards a person wanting to offload their rubbish?

There was also the Bluetooth device to check whether a nappy was dirty or not and a good dog collar to reward your dog with a treat for good behaviour.

How about a powernap sleeping bag which can charge your devices?
How about a powernap sleeping bag which can charge your devices?


NSW student James Drielsma came up with the winning idea of a powernap sleeping bag to charge your devices using the energy created by the difference in the temperature outside and inside your sleeping bag.

It comes amid growing concern among educators, universities and tech companies that not enough students are being inspired to excel in fields leading to the jobs of the future.

Only about 16% of students enter STEM fields in higher education.

Questacon - The National Science and Technology Centre, have been collaborating on the campaign.

Tess Ariotti, head of corporate responsibility at Samsung Australia, says the company is passionate about working with schools to make subjects like maths and science more exciting for students.

"We hear from students that maths and science can be boring and difficult, with no clear connection between these subjects and their dream jobs.

"What we'd like to rethink is how STEM can go beyond the traditional disciplines of science, technology, engineering and maths and how it can support young people, their interests and future. "

The Make My Idea campaign highlights to students the types of jobs involved in turning create ideas into real products.

Some of the ideas students submitted were developed to prototype level.

"Ideas have no value if they don't actually get made,'' Nigel Clark, the creative group head of Leo Burnett Sydney, says.

"We wanted to show teenagers that almost everything they love and take for granted, from the phone in their pocket and the music in their ears to the sports they play and watch, wouldn't be made possible without STEM."

Ms Ariotti agreed changes had to start in the classrooms, moving away from teachers sharing set knowledge to encourage innovation in thinking and problem solving by students.

She said the most successful students in the future would be those who had skills in a range of STEM subjects to ensure they could innovate and develop new ideas.

Ms Ariotti believed the future of Australia was in 'really good hands' based on the many ideas coming forward from young people, who had grown up with great technology.

"I think young people are super engaged. They have got a lot to say."

Topics:  education engineering games and gadgets innovation maths samsung science technology

News Corp Australia


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