Solo Bins' Shani Wood and Tweed Council officer Sascha Piotrkowski with Mt St Pat students Luke Chaffer and Rose Bradfield.
Solo Bins' Shani Wood and Tweed Council officer Sascha Piotrkowski with Mt St Pat students Luke Chaffer and Rose Bradfield. Blainey Woodham

Schools back recycling plan

MORE than 400 Tweed primary school students have joined in a council campaign to encourage Tweed households to recycle garbage and “do the right bin”.

They took part in a sticker-design competition - with the best four stickers going out to 10,000 Tweed families in an information pack that accompanies the new yellow-lidded recyclables bins.

Yesterday two of the winners - Year-four student Rose Bradfield, aged 10, and Year-six student Luke Chaffer, 12, both from Mt St Patrick Primary School in Murwillumbah were awarded their prizes.

The prizes included a certificate plus an “eco backpack” made from recycled plastic, a ruler from re- cycled materials, a drink bottle, a mini wheelie bin, a collection of pens from recycled paper, a pen made from corn starch, a colouring book and a cap.

Teacher Brendan Ryan said 10,000 copies of each winning sticker was being sent to Tweed households, and Mt St Patrick students had taken part in the competition after Tweed Shire Council sent flyers to primary schools inviting participation.

Mt St Patrick school, he said, already had its own recycling system in place, with yellow and green- lidded bins - plus other bins for food scraps, giving the students a head-start in understanding recycling.

A council spokesperson said nine schools entered the competition.

“Winners were selected not just because of artistic skill but also because of the messages,” she said.

The other two winners were Talisha Atkinson from Tyalgum Public School and Carly Jarvis from Crystal Creek Public School.

Two weeks ago the council unveiled its extra bins aimed at increasing recycling rates. More than 100,000 new bins are being distributed to households in time for the first waste collection under the new system on Tuesday, December 1.

Most householders are getting two new bins, one with a red lid, the other with a yellow lid, to replace their existing grey-lidded bins which have an internal divider for recyclables.

Mayor Warren Polglase said the new multi-bin system would increase recycling on the Tweed, reduce landfill and provide an improved waste-collection service.

He called on householders to become familiar with the coloured lids on the new bin.

“Separating the bins provides a clearer message that the three bins are for three different kinds of waste,” he said.

The Tweed's recovery rate of materials for recycling hovers around 35 per cent.

The introduction of the multi-bin system is a major step towards the State Government target of 66 per cent diversion from landfill by 2014.

It is the first major change to the Tweed's garbage collection since 1995, when split bins were introduced.



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