PEOPLE bomb-diving near four dolphins that have settled in Cudgen Creek are threatening the dolphins’ lives, wildlife carers have said.

“The juvenile dolphin could die just from the shock,” Barry Bryant from Australian Seabird Rescue, which cares for marine wildlife, said.

“Any stress in close proximity to people could tip them over.”

The pod of bottlenose dolphins has been at the popular swimming spot, about a kilometre inland, for a week.

“Kids have been bombing off the bridge and the impact on the water puts the dolphins off feeding,” Mr Bryant said.

“The longer they go with lower than 10kg of fish a day ... they lose condition and, once they lose condition, it’ll be harder when they go back out.” Mr Bryant said the public had cooperated with Australian Seabird Rescue but “our biggest problem will be Australia Day”.

While it is not unusual to spot dolphins in Tweed creeks, Mr Bryant said it was a concern to see them stay around for so long.

One of the male dolphins left the creek last week but returned on Saturday night, Mr Bryant said.

“We’re hoping it knows the way out and might take the other three with it,” he said.

“The adults want to get out but the little one is hesitant.”

The dolphins are being monitored by Australian Seabird Rescue, National Parks rangers and SeaWorld staff.

“If nothing’s done by Wednesday we’ll try to use a net to shoo them out,” Mr Bryant said.

Previous attempts to force the pod out, by lining up boats and kayaks and making noise, were unsuccessful.



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