GOODBYE BRIDGE: Cudgen Creek Bridge and inset, Kingscliff-based singer Casey Barnes.
GOODBYE BRIDGE: Cudgen Creek Bridge and inset, Kingscliff-based singer Casey Barnes. Casey Barnes

Singing the blues over K’cliff bridge

THE fall-out from the closure of Cudgen Creek Bridge continues, with council staff forced to respond to complaints from residents having a tough time letting go of the structure.

The 57-year-old relic, known by some locals as the “piano bridge” for its acoustics as tyres roll over the rickety wooden ribs, was shut on Monday as council prepares to replace the bridge with a new concrete structure.

In a complaint to Tweed Shire Council, Kingscliff resident and country singer Casey Barnes said he was concerned it could take an extra 10 minutes for ambulances stationed at Marine Pde to reach their destination.

“The fastest access route for anyone with a medical emergency trying to get to Tweed Hospital is going to be completely shut off, adding on precious minutes to an ambulance’s trip,” he said.

Mr Barnes also sang the blues, with a chorus of locals, over negative impacts on businesses.

“Approval should never have been given for development in the Salt and Casuarina area until the appropriate infrastructure to support it was put in place,” he said.

“I’m absolutely gob smacked that the council hasn’t thought this out better.”

File photo of musician Casey Barnes when he landed a place at the Country Summer Festival in California.
File photo of musician Casey Barnes when he landed a place at the Country Summer Festival in California. Blainey Woodham

In response to Mr Barnes, communications officer Anthony Morton said building the new bridge required demolition of the existing one and constraints did not allow a new bridge on the western side.

He said building a new bridge whilst the original remained would be too expensive and would see the need to acquire non-council land that is environmentally sensitive.

“Other alternatives such as keeping one lane open at a time have been explored, however the increased time frame, expense and environmental impact make them not viable,” he said.

He said handrails on the pedestrian bridge were an interim measure and will soon be removed to allow emergency service access.

More meetings with emergency services are planned, as is a “shop local” campaign to help Kingscliff businesses.

Cudgen Creek Bridge

Closed until Dec

Cost $3-$4 million

Council to push “shop local” campaign to help businesses

New bridge features: 80-100 year life span, wider lanes, raised approach

Compliant traffic barriers and increased fish movement.



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