Canadian national Donnie Culbert and UK resident Catherine Kinsella are an hour apart on the NSW and Queensland border, despite being seperated by less than a metre.
Canadian national Donnie Culbert and UK resident Catherine Kinsella are an hour apart on the NSW and Queensland border, despite being seperated by less than a metre. Daniel McKenzie

States split by time debate

AS NORTHERN NSW residents prepare to wind back the clock an hour on Sunday, the daylight saving debate continues.

Opinion is split on whether it should remain as is, and Queensland should join in on forwarding their clocks during summer, or not.

From the first Sunday in October to the first weekend of April, long afternoons and dark mornings are the order of the day for those in NSW, while Queensland experiences the opposite as residents with cross-border employment and sporting commitments are left to scratch their heads along with tourists struggling to grasp the concept.

Tweed MP Geoff Provest believes the disruption of daylight savings should be minimised and has been championing a proposal to have the time period cut by four weeks in NSW.

How should we fix the daylight saving time warp dilemma?

This poll ended on 29 April 2016.

Current Results

Shorten the daylight saving period by four weeks

19%

Abolish it completely

26%

Nothing - leave it as it is

10%

Queensland should adopt daylight saving

43%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Mr Provest is hopeful the National Party proposal will be embraced when introduced into Parliament's Upper House, expected in May, and passed in time to be introduced as early as October before daylight saving starts again.

"The proposal is to kick daylight saving out the week of March 2 (four weeks earlier than currently exists) and my feeling is that in the party room there's a lot who would support it," Mr Provest said.

"I'm hopeful the general consensus is that it goes on for too long. This morning in Sydney I got up in the dark and that's a common complaint whether you live in Tweed Heads or Bondi Beach."

Mr Provest said the impact of daylight savings was exaggerated on the Tweed, where social and economic ramifications were felt strongly due to the proximity of the border.

"Around 30% of people work across the border. Fifteen percent of our kids go to school across the border and most of our medical experts work over the border at John Flynn Hospital," he said.

"There's an economic cost as well as social benefits: families split by time zones struggle."

Mr Provest said while some residents were strongly in favour of daylight savings and others strongly opposed, the overall consensus is that it goes on for too long.

A quick poll of Tweed residents this week found opposing viewpoints.

Tweed resident Paul Thompson said it should be reduced to better manage border confusion, while Kingscliff resident Sheila Nelson said mornings were too dark now.

Conversely South Tweed's Sarah Batchelor and Banora Point's Nicole Steel wanted the period to go for as long as possible, with long afternoons suiting their lifestyles.

For Canadian national and western Queensland resident Donnie Culbert, who visits the Tweed regularly, the answer was simple: "Daylight savings should extend across the border - it would eliminate all confusion and would have far less impact on tourism."



Ex-bikies follow a new path

Ex-bikies follow a new path

Hardened criminals find church to change their lives around

Chillingham Voices' Sip, Sup, Sing

Chillingham Voices' Sip, Sup, Sing

Join the Chillingham entertainers for a choral, culinary caberet

Yaru's vision of closing health gap

Yaru's vision of closing health gap

Award-winning business joins forces with Fred Hollows Foundation.

Local Partners