Elliot Khal from Kingscliff High School rolls up his sleeves to plant a tree at Cudgen Creek. Blainey Woodham.
Elliot Khal from Kingscliff High School rolls up his sleeves to plant a tree at Cudgen Creek. Blainey Woodham. Blainey Woodham

Students go native at Cudgen Creek

KINGSCLIFF High School students did their bit for the environment and learnt a bit about native trees when they planted over 80 trees at Cudgen Creek today.

Founding members of the Marine Action Conservation Society (MACS) Tim Jack Adams and Michael Munday instructed the 20 students as they dug holes and planted a variety of natives on the riparian strip.

"This is stage one of a bigger project to rehabilitate this parcel of land," Mr Munday said.

"The students had a great time and showed genuine enthusiasm.

"They planted a range of species from paperbark through to coastal sheoak."

Mr Munday said the experience provided hands-on experience to back up their studies and also gave students a sense of stewardship.

"They can take pride in being responsible for the existence of the trees and watch them grow over the years," he said.

"Watching their work come to fruition will be a satisfying achievement for them."

Mr Adams said he was taken aback at the level of passion for the task shown by the Year 10 and 11 students.

"They are very keen to be a part of the restoration process," he said.

MACS will be officially launched on September 29 in the Kingscliff Community Hall at 6pm.
 



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