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Surfers blessed with the sound of a didgeridoo

RUSSELL Corowa and his didgeridoo are a constant fixture at Snapper Rocks.

The Aboriginal man celebrates his proud indigenous heritage by blessing the surf while overlooking the crashing waves that sweep over the rocky coastline.

This morning he watched over Mick Fanning and other surfers while they tackled the large swells, serenading them with the soulful sounds of his didgeridoo.

They mightn't have been able to hear him over the pounding surf, but Mr Corowa didn't care.

He was at one with nature and with his native land.

"I'm here to bring the spirit to this, our land, Bundjalung," he said.

"The spirits bring me here to celebrate mother nature."

Mr Corowa was grinning ear to ear as he talked about the surrounding beauty of Snapper Rocks, which he clearly adored.

"I'm a local Bundjalung, butterfly spirit. And we're standing on the rock spirits," he said.

He pointed out the deep spirituality he felt towards the ocean that he was gazing upon.

"There's spirit in everything on this Earth," he said.

"And all the energy that's out in the oceans with the animals belongs to you. We're part of it, we came from it."

Topics:  snapper rocks



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