Bianca Corowa, left, and partner Luke Morseu-Tomlinson, right, with their children Pearl and Shellbee with Tweed/Byron LAC Aboriginal liaison officer Beck Couch and Superintendent Wayne Starling.
Bianca Corowa, left, and partner Luke Morseu-Tomlinson, right, with their children Pearl and Shellbee with Tweed/Byron LAC Aboriginal liaison officer Beck Couch and Superintendent Wayne Starling. Liana Turner

Tackling social issues head-on

TWEED Heads woman Bianca Corowa has gone from beauty therapy to helping her community on another level.

She’s one of 35 people registered for a course helping Aboriginal community members and support workers to tackle social issues like domestic violence, child abuse and sexual abuse.

This is the first time the six-week course, run across 12 months, has been held on the Tweed and it has attracted a record number of participants from across the state.

The Certificate 4 in Aboriginal and Family Health, run by NSW Health’s Education Centre Against Violence, began at Kingscliff TAFE last week. While many participants were from the Tweed, others came from as far as Sydney, Bourke and Taree.

Ms Corowa, who previously studied beauty therapy, was attracted to the course as a unique – and free – opportunity for Aboriginal service providers and community members.

After the first week, she felt empowered to help address issues in her community.

“I’ve really enjoyed this course this week,” Ms Corowa said.

“Now I have that knowledge I feel I have a responsibility to help our community. I can’t wait to see how far this takes me.”

Trainer Cigrid Herring said the level of interest in the course reflected great need within the community.

Trainers Natalie Short, Marlene Lauw, Cigrid Herring, Aunty Mareese Terare, Tweed/Byron LAC Aboriginal Liaison Officer Beck Couch, Crime Coordinator Cameron Miller and Superintendent Wayne Starling and (front) Bianca Corowa, Luke Morseu-Tomlinson with children Pearl, 15 months and Shellbee, 4 weeks.
Trainers Natalie Short, Marlene Lauw, Cigrid Herring, Aunty Mareese Terare, Tweed/Byron LAC Aboriginal Liaison Officer Beck Couch, Crime Coordinator Cameron Miller and Superintendent Wayne Starling and (front) Bianca Corowa, Luke Morseu-Tomlinson with children Pearl, 15 months and Shellbee, 4 weeks. Liana Turner

“We look at the impacts that Aboriginal people still feel from a colonised life,” she said.

“We never want to talk about Aboriginal people as a disadvantaged people, because we’re a great people but we have faced disadvantage.”

Participants will help to address social issues like domestic violence, child abuse and sexual abuse with these cultural traumas in mind.

Tweed/Byron LAC Aboriginal liaison officer Beck Couch said it was fantastic to see such a strong response to the course.

“It takes an entire community... to address community issues of domestic and family violence and child and sexual assault,” she said.

Tweed/Byron LAC Superintendent Wayne Starling and crime co-ordinator Cameron Miller met with the participants and trainers on Friday.

A community forum on domestic violence will be held at Banora Point Community Centre tomorrow night from 6-8pm.

RSVP to amanda.hall@ parliament.nsw.gov.au.



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