Water levels in Clarrie Hall Dam would rise under a proposal to raise the dam wall.
Water levels in Clarrie Hall Dam would rise under a proposal to raise the dam wall.

Tanks people but Tweed dam stays

THE main source of water for Tweed’s population will always be a dam and talk of capping the population would only make the Tweed an expensive, elitist area says mayor Warren Polglase.

Mr Polglase yesterday hit back at criticisms of the council’s preferred options for future water supply by the conservationist lobby group, Caldera Environment Centre.

The group has called a public meeting at Uki on Monday night protesting against plans which could include a new dam at Byrill Creek, raising the wall of the existing Clarrie Hall dam and pipelines to either the Gold Coast or Lismore.

Members of the group have instead proposed council-funded household rainwater tanks and a population cap as ways of guaranteeing the Tweed’s future water supply.

“You can have all the water tanks you like but the main source of water will always be a dam,” said Cr Polglase.

“How big a tank can people get on their property to store water?

“Lot sizes are becoming smaller and with tanks you can only use the water for toilets and washing.

“Now with building approvals people have to install water tanks anyway but there will always be a storage supply somewhere.”

Cr Polglase said a population cap would only ensure the Tweed became an “elitist area” where people without sufficient resources would not be able to live.

“That’s not what the Tweed is all about,” he said.

“The Tweed is for all people who wish to live here no matter what their means.”

Cr Polglase said groups like the Caldera Environment Centre “can have as many meetings as they like” but the council had put in place “arms-length” community consultation.

He said a committee of nine community representatives had been selected by Southern Cross University and had its first last Tuesday night.

“They have a six or seven month timeframe to address all options and issues and that group will then report back to Council,” he said.

“The work group has been set up to address the issue of water augmentation in the Tweed for the next 30 to 50 years.

Earlier this week it was announced that the Caldera Environment Centre has called a public meeting in the Uki hall next Monday night starting at 7pm.

According to one of the meeting organisers Joanna Gardner the proposal for a new dam means residents at Byrill Creek who protested against the recent world championship car rally are “jumping from the frying pan Rally into the Dam fire”.

What do you think? Do we need a dam? Have your say - leave a comment below.



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