Business

Technology lovers unhappy with ‘Australian Tax’

Tyson Curtis. Australia pays twice more than Americans for itunes.
Tyson Curtis. Australia pays twice more than Americans for itunes. John Gass

AUSTRALIAN residents are right behind the Australian Government's IT Pricing Inquiry ramping up its investigation into the 'Australian Tax'.

Subpoenas were issued to major technology corporations including Adobe, Apple and Microsoft on Wednesday.

The three companies were told to appear in court next month to answer why some prices are higher in Australia compared to international markets.

Lindisfarne Anglican Grammar School student Tyson Curtis, 17, said it wasn't fair, especially when it came to price discrepancies between Australian iTunes and the United States iTunes.

"It's just kinda outrageous," he said.

The Year 12 student said many of his friends had iPhones "or at the least an iPod" that would be forced to use compatible software iTunes.

"There's no cost for delivery so it's kinda (sic) stupid," he said.

Tyson said his mates often went to illegal measures to get their multimedia for free because it was too expensive, especially for full time students who only work part time.

"It doesn't surprise me when they say Australia has the highest rate of illegal downloading," he said.

"The price pushes people to.

"If it was $1 it would be okay but when its $3 or $4 it just keeps adding up and then sometimes its $10 for two songs."

The teen said he made exceptions when buying music online especially when it came to Australian artists.

"I'll always pay for Australian music," he said.

Tyson said emerging Australian artist Flume was one of his most recent purchases.

The three companies will before the House Committee on 22 March to address concerns about overpriced IT goods being sold in Australia.



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