Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Australian Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg speak during a press conference at Parliament House in Canberra, Monday, August 20, 2018.
Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Australian Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg speak during a press conference at Parliament House in Canberra, Monday, August 20, 2018. AAP Image - Lukas Coch

TOTAL SURRENDER: Desperate Turnbull’s humiliating backflip

PRIME Minister Malcolm Turnbull has dumped the carbon emissions reduction target from his National Energy Guarantee (NEG) policy, as it doesn't have enough support to get through the House of Representatives.

He made the announcement beside Scott Morrisson and Josh Frydenberg as he was grilled on a number of backflips and broken promises by the press

"It's clear that in the absence of bipartisan support, the legislation to move forward the emissions component of the National Energy Guarantee will not be able to pass the House of Representatives," Mr Turnbull said at a press conference this morning.

Was it the right move to dump the carbon emissions reduction target?

This poll ended on 27 August 2018.

Current Results

Yes, it was bad for the nation's economy

56%

No, the environment needs to come first

33%

Turnbull had no other choice

10%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Mr Turnbull originally intended to pass legislation as part of the NEG policy to reduce emissions by 26 to 28 per cent on 2005 levels by 2030.

The policy was approved by the coalition party room last week and was also backed by industry, experts and consumer groups.

"I've never seen an energy policy that has broader support," Mr Turnbull said.

However, since then a number of backbenchers including former prime minister Tony Abbott have pushed back against the policy and Mr Turnbull's leadership. The Prime Minister has now abandoned the target.

"In a parliament where there is just a one-seat majority, the outstanding reservations of a number of our colleagues, combined with the absence of bipartisan support means that as long as that remains the case, we won't be in a position to take that legislation forward," Mr Turnbull said.

He said he would move the measure forward again if there was sufficient support in the lower house.

While Labor has not confirmed publicly whether it would support the policy, Mr Turnbull pointed out that the rival party's emissions reduction target was 45 per cent, compared to the government's target of 26 per cent.

"Labor have given no indication whatsoever, that they would support this," Treasurer Scott Morrison said.

"If Labor support it, they should come out and say so. I don't think there is any reason why the government would think anything other than the Labor Party would continue to play the wrecker role and not seek to engage constructively on this issue."

News Corp Australia


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