STRONG SUPPORT: Irish immigrants attended a meeting at the School of Arts building in Murwillumbah to support Irish Home Rule.
STRONG SUPPORT: Irish immigrants attended a meeting at the School of Arts building in Murwillumbah to support Irish Home Rule.

Tweed has strong Irish ties

AS TWEED celebrates StPatrick's Day today, it's a good time to reflect on the impact Irish settlers have had on the region.

During the the era from 1895 to the beginning of World War I, Britain was grappling with the best way to manage Home Rule, the name given to the process of allowing Ireland more say in how it was governed.

Irish immigrants on the Tweed wanted to show their solidarity from across the seas, holding their first meeting in support of Home Rule in Ireland at the School of Arts building in Murwillumbah in 1889.

About 150 local residents turned out to hear Irish politician Sir Thomas HenryGrattan Esmonde give an address about Home Rule at the School of Arts building.

Sir Thomas, who had become the MP for South Dublin in 1885, travelled extensively across the worldin an effort to gain more support for Irish Home Rule.

Tweed historian Di Millar contributed significantly to the Tweed Daily News' 125-year commemorative publication in 2013, from which this information has been extracted.



Young Occhilupo eyes off national title

Young Occhilupo eyes off national title

Occy's son a chip off the old block.

Take a look inside this week's feature property in Casuarina

Take a look inside this week's feature property in Casuarina

This resort-style home offers a luxurious lifestyle

Racing is in the blood for Tweed's Brendan Strong

Racing is in the blood for Tweed's Brendan Strong

Tweed racer goes down memory lane ahead of Gold Coast 600.

Local Partners