Director of the Intensive Care Unit at The Tweed Hospital Dr Michael Lindley-Jones says the community should be proud the hospital is adding to international research. Photo: Alina Rylko
Director of the Intensive Care Unit at The Tweed Hospital Dr Michael Lindley-Jones says the community should be proud the hospital is adding to international research. Photo: Alina Rylko Alina Rylko

Tweed Hospital research reaching the world stage

THE Tweed Hospital might be small compared to those in the cities, or on the Gold Coast, but it is taking part in some major research projects.

One study which Tweed residents can be involved in aims to solve the question of whether or not steroids help to resolve severe infections.

Dr Michael Lindley-Jones, director of intensive care unit, is overseeing patient enrolment into a randomised study that will be published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine.

"The use of steroid therapy in sepsis is an international dilemma - some clinicians have supported steroids and some have not, and they both have valid reasons. This study will point to the definitive answer," he said.

Dr Lindley-Jones says that patients will be asked to take part in the study if they are admitted to the intensive care unit with a septic infection.

"The infection could be from an injury, pneumonia or skin infection, or any infection in the body which could lead to a person getting very sick.

"With their permission they will get one of two treatments - steroid or no steroid - and we don't know which one they get and neither will they."

Dr Lindley-Jones says the community should be proud that their clinicians are contributing to global research.

"This is a multi centre study where Tweed will be one of the contributing hospitals and the results will be international news," he said.

"There's a great deal of energy that goes into the research, and I think the community should be proud that we are doing it because we're not a big funded centre with professors and we're still contributing in a very positive way to medical knowledge."

"Most staff use personal time to work on studies and that is keeping them engaged with improving their knowledge and this is reflected on the service they give to the community."



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