News

Police utilise social media

Chief Inspector Josh Maxwell.
Chief Inspector Josh Maxwell.

TWEED Shire Neighbourhood Watch groups are now better equipped to move into the 21st century with a Facebook tutorial from Tweed police.

The concerned residents met with Chief Inspector Joshua Maxwell, Tweed MP Geoff Provest, Tweed Byron Local Area Command Superintendent Stuart Wilkins and acting crime manager Detective Acting Inspector Saul Wiseman who explained the new police initiative using social media.

Project Eyewatch involves each NSW police command monitoring a Facebook page that can be used to communicate with the community and local Neighbourhood Watch groups with information on arrests, missing persons and suspect information.

Chief Insp Maxwell said the concept was a world first that would allow police to communicate with their community in real time.

Supt Wilkins said Tweed Byron police were committed to responding to the needs of the community but emphasised the Facebook page was not to be used for reporting crime and to always call 000 in emergencies.

“It’s about keeping the community aware, a site for consultation and discussion on police matters” he said.

Visit Tweed police online by searching for Tweed Byron LAC on Facebook.

Topics:  facebook tweed police



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