Blainey Woodham

$16,500 of speeding fines refunded

MORE than $16,500 of speeding fines from Tweed Shire cameras have been refunded.

Faulty cameras and inadequate signage have seen nearly 19,000 fines totalling $3.8 million from fixed speed cameras repaid, NSW Opposition leader Barry O'Farrell revealed this week.

Sixty-four fines from the Pacific Highway Banora Point camera and seven from the Tweed Valley Way Burringbar camera, adding up to $16,518, were refunded between July 2007 and May 2010, Freedom of Information documents obtained by the NSW Liberals and Nationals showed.

The Sexton Hill speed camera, which generates about $1 million of revenue for the State Government per annum, was identified as the 60th worst speed camera in the state.

But a Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) spokesman yesterday confirmed the camera was not faulty.

“The speed camera at Sexton Hill is working correctly,” he said.

“Penalties (including fines and licence points) can be withdrawn for a number of reasons – detections of emergency service vehicles are withdrawn, as are those for stolen vehicles, registered owners of a vehicle being deceased, equipment being vandalised or signs warning of the fixed speed cameras being obscured due to road work.”

Mr O'Farrell said motor- ists need to have confidence that if they are fined by the speed cameras it's fair and accurate.

“With the Keneally Labor Government increasing the number of speed cameras in use, it needs to assure motorists they aren't being fined incorrectly,” he said.

Banora Point Residents Association secretary Pat Tate said they had not heard of any complaints regarding the camera.

“Our residents must all be law-abiding and stick to the speed limit,” Mrs Tate said.

“It does help to keep the speed limit in check.”

Sexton Hill was previ- ously one of the Tweed's black spots.

“There's been a lot of semi-trailers overturned going around that bend,” Mrs Tate said.

She added none of their members was opposed to speed cameras, however, they recently lodged an objection through State MP Geoff Provest regarding mobile speed cameras.

“We're objecting to their operation being handed over to the RTA (Road and Traffic Authority) and from their being outsourced to private enterprises.”

The Tweed Daily News in June revealed the controversial Sexton Hill speed camera may be removed once the Pacific Highway Banora Point upgrade is completed.



Police seize ketamine stash after routine traffic stop

Premium Content Police seize ketamine stash after routine traffic stop

Officers are preparing to charge a man after the alleged find

North Coast construction sites fined for unsafe practices

Premium Content North Coast construction sites fined for unsafe practices

SafeWork issued fines to a number of construction sites

After 30 years of planning, bypass opens in true Byron style

Premium Content After 30 years of planning, bypass opens in true Byron style

A convoy of Kombis were the first vehicles to travel the new road