Tweed Shire Council would have to release up to 35 megalitres a day from Clarrie Hall Dam to supply drinking water to the Tweed. Picture: Supplied.
Tweed Shire Council would have to release up to 35 megalitres a day from Clarrie Hall Dam to supply drinking water to the Tweed. Picture: Supplied.

Tweed’s green scenery is deceptive

RECENT rain has done little to reprieve Tweed's water crisis as Clarrie Hall Dam's water level drops.

Tweed Shire Council water and wastewater manager Anthony Burnham said the Tweed River was no longer flowing over Bray Park Weir.

"If we don't get rain in the catchment that is forecast for this week we will have to increase our releases from the dam to supply the community," Mr Burnham said.

Mr Burnham said council was obliged to release four megaliters of water a day to maintain environmental flows and river health.

He said council would have to release between 32 and 35 megalitres a day to supply drinking water.

"Over the weekend, the dam level fell 0.3 per cent, from 81.4 per

cent on Friday to 81.1 per cent on Monday," he said.

"Meanwhile, water use figures have risen, with the average person again using 180 litres a day after falling to 174 litres a day before the recent rain.

He said the green hues of the Tweed Valley was a doubled-edged sword when it came to water restrictions.

"The scenery does not accurately reflect the situation we are in."

"Level 2 water restrictions remain in place throughout the Tweed, except in Tyalgum, which is fed by the alternate Oxley River system.

"If we need to start releasing from Clarrie Hall Dam to supply drinking water to the community we can expect the dam to drop nearly two per cent a week, which means we will quickly lose any advantage afforded by the recent rain."

Tweed residents are urged to double their efforts to save water now and delay the implementation of harsher water restrictions which will harm Tweed businesses.

"It's up to you to stay at Level 2," Mr Burnham said.

He said council would again ramp up its education campaign to reduce water use.

"Residents with tank supplies filled by the recent rain are reminded that those supplies are subject to the current restrictions.

"If your tank is not entirely independent of the town water supply, you must comply with all water restrictions.

"Watering lawns is banned, as is the use of sprinkler and soaker hoses," he said.

Visit tweed.nsw.gov.au/savewaternow for the full list of restrictions.



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