Carig Jones of Moogoo
Carig Jones of Moogoo

Moogoo knocks back massive China deal due to ethics

PRIOR to the federal election, Health Minister Tanya Plibersek announced a re-elected Labor government would phase out animal-tested cosmetic products from the Australian market.

The new LNP government, yet to announce its cabinet, was so far unable to comment on whether or not such a movement would go ahead under their leadership.

Founder of Tweed-based skincare company Moogoo, Craig Jones, supports the idea, with hopes animal-tested products would be eliminated from the Australian market.

Mr Jones said while this would cost the company 1.3 billion potential customers, they would not risk their reputation as cruelty-free.

"Thankfully, to our knowledge, there are no skin care companies that test on animals within Australia," Mr Jones said.

"The EU has also banned the sale of cosmetics tested on animals."

"It would seem logical that Australia does the same."

"We think the ban on the sale of skin care products that have been tested on animals would be a great step in ensuring that animal testing becomes a thing of the past."

Mr Jones said Moogoo has recently declined distribution to China because the government refused to import skincare products which had not been tested on animals.

Mr Jones said while this would cost the company 1.3 billion potential customers, they would not risk their reputation as cruelty-free.

"This means that any skin care company exporting to China is having its products animal tested, and that is not something we can condone," Mr Jones said.

Mr Jones said Moogoo is undergoing discussions with Humane Society International's "Choose Cruelty Free China" organization.

The company hopes to assist in the campaign to end China's requirements for animal testing on skincare products.

After research published in the Journal of Applied Polymer Science suggested a new synthetic skin could leave lab-testing animals obsolete, Mr Jones said it is time all skincare and cosmetic companies practice ethics by not testing their products or ingredients on animals.

"Australians often email us to check that we do not test on animals and so this is obviously an issue that is very important to them as well," Mr Jones said.

"Now that there are alternatives to ensure safety of products, it should be phased out worldwide."

"There is definitely a shift towards products that are not only healthy and natural, but ethical as well."

While Mr Jones said mainstream medicine's increasing use of natural ingredients is positive, new ingredients would always mean more testing.

"Natural foods and medicines should have a greater role in medicine and we are delighted that some new potent natural extracts are finding credibility with mainstream medical practitioners," Mr Jones said.

"On the other hand, it does mean that some new extracts used in skin care are also being tested by researchers on animals, in particular mice, in order to study their effectiveness in preventing disease such as skin cancer."

"So any new laws will have to take into account testing that has been done by researchers as opposed to testing done by the companies."



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